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Photos from Fields Auto Works's post ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

2021 Land Rover TReK ... See MoreSee Less

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How $3,300 Rims Are Made ... See MoreSee Less

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A Simple Explanation for the VTEC Engine! ... See MoreSee Less

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Timeline photos ... See MoreSee Less

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Träume ... See MoreSee Less

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The Debate you need to see! Bore vs Stroke! ... See MoreSee Less

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Why Going 0 To 60 Mph In Under 2 Seconds Is Almost Impossible ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

and here is the legendary Burt Munro's world fastest Indian ... See MoreSee Less

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Photos from Road Scholars's post ... See MoreSee Less

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Ferrari F50 At Nurburgring +VOLUME+ AMAZING ENGINE SOUND ... See MoreSee Less

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*Frantically looks for flooded Teslas* ... See MoreSee Less

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Photos from Bugatti's post ... See MoreSee Less

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How Does Koenigseggs Tiny Engine Makes 600HP! ... See MoreSee Less

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Spotted for sale is a 1991 Dinan BMW V12 750IL twin turbo for $32,000

1 of 12
150k miles
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2 months ago

Spotted for sale is a 1991 Dinan BMW V12 750IL twin turbo for $32,000

1 of 12
150k milesImage attachmentImage attachment

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2 months ago

Comment on Facebook

There’s currently two whole generations who won’t get this.

How they assemble spirit airlines planes

Perscheids Abgründe was a great cartoon artist. ❤

Spitfire Cockpit ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Spitfire Cockpit

il preside volante ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

A coal-gas powered taxicab operated by John Lee Automobile Engineers in Keighley, England. The bag atop the vehicle stored sufficient fuel for 15 miles of driving (c. 1920s) ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

A coal-gas powered taxicab operated by John Lee Automobile Engineers in Keighley, England. The bag atop the vehicle stored sufficient fuel for 15 miles of driving (c. 1920s)

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The Pegaso Z-102 was a Spanish sports car produced by Pegaso in Spain in both coupé and cabriolet form between 1951 and 1958. The Z-102 was the fastest production car in the world at the time of production, having reached a top speed of 151 mph (243 km/h).
Pegaso was an established company noted for its trucks and motor coaches, but also produced sports cars for seven years. Pegaso's chief technical manager was Wifredo Ricart who formerly worked as chief engineer for Alfa Romeo, and while there designed the Alfa Romeo Tipo 512. The Z-102 started life as a pair of prototypes in 1951 with coupe and drophead body styles. Both prototypes had steel bodies which were determined to be too heavy and Pegaso made the decision to switch to alloy bodies to save weight. However, the cars were still quite heavy and brutish to drive and racing success was virtually nonexistent. Because the cars were built on a cost-no-object basis the car soon proved too costly to warrant continued production and the Z-102 was discontinued after 1958. A simplified and cheaper version, the Z-103 with 3.9, 4.5 and 4.7 litre engines, was put into production but had little success and only 3 were built.
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2 months ago

The Pegaso Z-102 was a Spanish sports car produced by Pegaso in Spain in both coupé and cabriolet form between 1951 and 1958. The Z-102 was the fastest production car in the world at the time of production, having reached a top speed of 151 mph (243 km/h).
Pegaso was an established company noted for its trucks and motor coaches, but also produced sports cars for seven years. Pegasos chief technical manager was Wifredo Ricart who formerly worked as chief engineer for Alfa Romeo, and while there designed the Alfa Romeo Tipo 512. The Z-102 started life as a pair of prototypes in 1951 with coupe and drophead body styles. Both prototypes had steel bodies which were determined to be too heavy and Pegaso made the decision to switch to alloy bodies to save weight.  However, the cars were still quite heavy and brutish to drive and racing success was virtually nonexistent. Because the cars were built on a cost-no-object basis the car soon proved too costly to warrant continued production and the Z-102 was discontinued after 1958. A simplified and cheaper version, the Z-103 with 3.9, 4.5 and 4.7 litre engines, was put into production but had little success and only 3 were built.

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Comment on Facebook

All u hear is the dyno spinning lol

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